Archive for sculptural

Sharbani Das Gupta

Title:  Drift

Size:  14″h x 14″w x 3″d

Price:  $300

Statement:  Separation and connection. My work is an act of figurative narration, with overtones of politics and socio-cultural issues and undertones of the personal. I exist between two countries, moving between political and environmental tensions and striving for balance in an uneven world. Inspiration comes from juxtapositions of the incongruous, myths and media and my life. Perspective comes from being the continuous visitor.
I hope that art, with its ability to mirror, breach boundaries and reveal the unseen, may yet be the way to make a difference. As the Native Americans have said: ‘We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children’. It is with this consciousness that I try to create, communicate, have a voice.

 

 

More about my work:  www.sharbanidasgupta.com

Sharbani Das Gupta

Ericka Norris

Title:  Ghost Parents

Size:  12″h x 6″w x 4″d

Light and Shadow:  For this year’s entry I’ve made a triptych of small figures. When I started working on my show entry my Mother in law was very ill.  This gave me deep thought into the nature of family and generations past and present.  In no other relationship do we experience such dynamic change as the one we have with our parents and children in both we hopefully accept a person going from helpless dependence to independence and sometimes back to dependence.  As I worked on these pieces my Mother in law left this world. Her spirit and the many facets of her personality will remain in our family through the generations. Each figure represents an aspect of the parents in my life both mine and my husband’s.

Price:  $120

Statement:  Coils, magic rocks and fire. My fascination with the pottery of the Southwest began at Beloit College where I studied pottery and installed a exhibit of Mimbres pre-Columbian pottery at the Logan Museum of anthropology.

Having lived in many places, I am pleased to call New Mexico my home or maybe it called me home. Working in the Southwest tradition of coil building was enhanced by the good fortune of studying with Sumi Von Dassow up in Denver. She taught me how to coil and burnish like a pro. More importantly she got me to take a risk and quit throwing tightly formed functional ware.
When I coil or hand build the inner critic goes: I know not where. Thus freed, everything but what I am working on melts away. The forms bubble up from deep inside. I would like to think the resulting vessels contain some of that spirit and energy and that it can be shared.

Ericka Norris

Luisa Baldinger #2

Title:  Vessel, Studio #153, Sandstone Song

Size: 10″h x 8″w x 8″d

Light and Shadow:  

Price:  $275

Statement:  A maker of containers all of my life in clay, I am intrigued by volume, negative/positive space, and complex surface, and work to have these elements orchestrate into a satisfying three-dimensional “vessel” idea. At this point, my vessels are simply sculptural forms, vehicles for the exploration of color, surface, movement in three directions. Inspiration comes from rocks found in the back arroyos, fragments of coral on a beach, plant parts, geologic elements. I imagine that these vessels might have been unearthed in an archeological dig somewhere, relics from an ancient culture, giving rise to questions about that culture: who were the folks who made these pots? What were they thinking? What ancient contents did these vessels hold?

More about my work:  www.willettbaldinger.com

Luisa Baldinger

Luisa Baldinger #1

Title:  Vessel, Studio #66, Stacked Rocks

Size:  15″h x 9″w x 5″d

Light and Shadow:  

Price:  $400

Statement:  A maker of containers all of my life in clay, I am intrigued by volume, negative/positive space, and complex surface, and work to have these elements orchestrate into a satisfying three-dimensional “vessel” idea. At this point, my vessels are simply sculptural forms, vehicles for the exploration of color, surface, movement in three directions. Inspiration comes from rocks found in the back arroyos, fragments of coral on a beach, plant parts, geologic elements. I imagine that these vessels might have been unearthed in an archeological dig somewhere, relics from an ancient culture, giving rise to questions about that culture: who were the folks who made these pots? What were they thinking? What ancient contents did these vessels hold?

More about my work: www.willettbaldingerceramics.com

Luisa Baldinger