Archive for decorated

Mary Gonzales

Title:  Crying Pansies

Size:  7″h x 5″w x 5″d

Light and Shadow:  Light and shadow are integral to the Crying Pansies jar, both physically and conceptually. The shadows of deep carving and undercutting of the petals creates depth and movement. Each pansy’s center is pierced to allow glaze to pour down each flower, creating wet, bright drips of blue and yellow, atop the deep earth red and dark night blue that covers the jar’s carved surface. The clear glaze creates windows for light to pass through, into the shaded interior. In the way that light and shadow can contrast as well as parallel one another, this jar is a culmination of my past, growing on a flower farm, and my future with Art.

Price:  NFS

Statement:  My art has a tendency to come from my fears of failure, romanticism of my past, and fantasies and frustrations about the future. My studio practice is an ever-evolving and sometimes maddening experience. My deepest love is in clay. Everything about the material, from the gooey pudding-like slip that covers my hands as I throw, to the (occasionally malicious) magic that takes place within the kiln. The material’s willingness to take on any form, texture, color, and purpose allows for continuous exploration in the studio; and the ability to hone skills and ideas through variation of repetition, whether subtle or drastic.

More about my work:  maryalicegonzales.com

Mary Gonzales

Jessica Penrod #1

Title:  Aspens

Size:  15″h x 7″w x 7″d

Light and Shadow:  The smoky effect of the Shino glaze gives it a shadowed atmosphere and the values in the trees show which direction a light source may be coming from. Aspen trees play with the idea of light and shadow and the colors of their trunks are black and white.

Price:   $315

Statement:  Originally a two-dimensional artist practicing painting and drawing, I found clay while I was attending college and soon changed my emphasis. I was taught how to throw with stoneware and after two years, I learned how to throw True Porcelain with a technique developed in Arita Japan. I am inspired by objects that we use everyday and find beauty in handmade, functional art. The surfaces of my work are decorated with images inspired by nature in the area that I grew up: a small town in Arizona called Pinetop. I love being able to use the clay as a surface for my paintings on pieces that I have made as well as collaborations with other artists.

Jessica Penrod

Jessica Penrod #2

Title:  Santa Fe Smoke Cups

Size:  3″h x 3″w x 3″d

Light and Shadow:  The surface of porcelain is normally white and pure. In the soda firing the clay traps carbon and creates a smoky greyish or even black look. With no glaze on the surface to determine color and having been placed in different places around the kiln, there is variation in how much carbon is seen on the surface.

Adding shadow and texture to something that is normally viewed as light and delicate can make it more inviting with less fear of damaging the piece.

Price:  NFS

Statement:  Originally a two-dimensional artist practicing painting and drawing, I found clay while I was attending college and soon changed my emphasis. I was taught how to throw with stoneware and after two years, I learned how to throw True Porcelain with a technique developed in Arita Japan. I am inspired by objects that we use everyday and find beauty in handmade, functional art. The surfaces of my work are decorated with images inspired by nature in the area that I grew up: a small town in Arizona called Pinetop. I love being able to use the clay as a surface for my paintings on pieces that I have made as well as collaborations with other artists.

Jessica Penrod, 2017 Arita porcelain award for Beauty, Quality and Functionality

Lisa McEneaney

Title:  Cat Bowl

Size:  3″h x 11″w x 11″d

Light and Shadow:  Variations in the glaze and the painting give the cat depth, creating shadow.

Price:  $80 SOLD 

Statement:  Clay is relatively new in my life, but it has enabled me to combine some of the things that are most important to me. As a child I painted and drew, most often animals and children. Then, life got serious and my love of animals led me to veterinary medicine. With retirement, I discovered Santa Fe, and rediscovered my love of painting and drawing when I found clay. I find nothing more satisfying than the feel of the clay as I make or throw a piece, and the drawing and painting on the piece as I decorate and glaze.

Lisa McEneaney