Author Archive for jnelsonmoore

Shane Silva

Title:  Clear Flower Bowl

Size:  3″h x 6″dia

Price:  $60

Shane Silva

Nicole Renee Peters #1

Title:  Inter-Reflections of My Attached Shadow- the Coexistence of Unconditional and Attached Loves

Size:  9.2″h x 5″w x 5.5″d

Light and Shadow:  “Inter-reflection: The illumination of an object by reflected light from other objects that are not light sources.”
“Attached Shadow: Attached shadows seem affixed on the subject. Attached shadows also give an object texture.”
The human heart, as a vessel, so capable of extending love to others, yet not always reciprocated in equal measure…One who cleaves to an unrequited love, attached to that object, to the pain of loving another who refuses to be an equal giver of light and illumination…And then simultaneously there can exist the light of unconditional love and the joy of giving it.  The darkness of attached, unrequited, romantic love; the shadow, the ego, the turmoil and anguish associated with that lack of reciprocation from one’s object of affections. The light and dark, the crevices and cracks, pealing layers and fissures of mottled love which stains us, colors our perceptions, our expectations. The attached shadow, affixes to the object itself, reflections of our own struggles, a mirror to our own darkness. And then the light. The inner light, external light. These cannot be known without the shadows. There is reciprocation in this relationship. The relationship of the subject and object, the inner and outer selves, the self and the other, the vessel and it’s environment, the artist and the viewer. We find both a beauty and a pain in this light and shadow of love and loving. All at once, sensations of oneness and aloneness, uniqueness and individuality. And in it, we may find both our purest and darkest qualities dancing together, either struggling to dominate one over the other, or living in harmony, recognizing our oneness.

Price:  $300

Statement:  I create from my heart, emotions channeled through my hands, my fingertips, kneading and stroking the clay. I care about creating pieces that are emotionally moving, sensual, and often dynamic. Textural. Most of the forms that emerge are shaped this way by my hands as the primary sculpting tools. I would like for viewers to really get into themselves and FEEL when they come into contact with my work.
Many of my sculptures are conceived and executed through exploration of pushing materials in unconventional ways. I enjoy the process as much as the end result and I really love clay for it’s freeing properties. My work is fluid, organic, loose. Like an impassioned, emotionally charged mad scientist, I allow inspiration to guide me in testing the limits of my creative hypotheses.
Connected to these Earth bodies and the whole of the natural world and cosmos…My work is elemental, if anything…I am enamored with exploring the multitude of ways that a few common shapes in all of nature repeat over and over again, combined in countless expressions. From the microscopic world to the macroscopic, we are all inter-connected. I am deeply moved by this beauty and intelligence. And very inspired by forms found in nature, particularly in the ocean, fluidity, and by human anatomy and physiology.  Highly expressive, emotional and sensual-A recurrent theme in my work is:  Finding incredible strength and freedom by allowing oneself to reside in vulnerability.

Sharbani Das Gupta

Title:  Drift

Size:  14″h x 14″w x 3″d

Price:  $300

Statement:  Separation and connection. My work is an act of figurative narration, with overtones of politics and socio-cultural issues and undertones of the personal. I exist between two countries, moving between political and environmental tensions and striving for balance in an uneven world. Inspiration comes from juxtapositions of the incongruous, myths and media and my life. Perspective comes from being the continuous visitor.
I hope that art, with its ability to mirror, breach boundaries and reveal the unseen, may yet be the way to make a difference. As the Native Americans have said: ‘We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children’. It is with this consciousness that I try to create, communicate, have a voice.

 

 

More about my work:  www.sharbanidasgupta.com

Sharbani Das Gupta

Darla Graff Thompson #1

Title:  Spotlight

Size:  15″h x 7″w x 7″d

Light and Shadow:  The point of light illumination is so strong that there appears to be physical impact and response— I’ve had a lot of thoughts on this piece, some playful and just for the fun of making it, but for me it also represents the idea of epiphany, a sudden personal enlightenment and illumination of something about ourselves that was previously hidden and in the shadows.

Price:  $400

Statement:  I began sculpting in the early 1980’s and continued creating with clay as I pursued an education in chemistry, providing my life with much-needed stress relief and balance. My sculptures are condensed thoughts or emotions that span a wide range of topics. In them, I see the faces of old friends— hints of my scientific nature, a lot of humor, and solid evidence of life’s joy and the variety of its experiences.

 

 

Darla Graff Thompson

Karin N Bergh #2

Title:  Two Hens and Three Eggs

Size: 1.25″h x 10″d

Light and Shadow:  I am focusing on how light and shadow play on the surface of this decorative (and functional) serving plate. Using techniques like incising, raised slip trailing and brushwork give the illusion of the hens parading through a grassy yard.
Hand thrown stoneware, reduction fired at ^ 10.

Price:  $85

Statement:  Karin has been making ceramics for over thirty years. Self-taught in the beginning, she then became an apprentice to Wilhelm and Elly Kuch in Germany, completing a three year program and receiving a certificate from the German Ceramics Guild. She spent many years traveling and working in Germany, Switzerland and Sweden and is fluent in several languages.

In her Santa Fe studio, Karin works in a variety of clay and glazing techniques, including hand painted majolica.

More about my work:  www.knbpottery.com

Karin N. Bergh

Amber Archer

Title:  Non-Traditional Raku Bowl

Size:  16″ w x 6″ d

Light and Shadow:  Yin and yang raw and glazed dark and light light and shadow

Price:  $225

Statement:  My passion is throwing – it has given me a sense of discipline and freedom.

More about my work: expressionsinclay.com

Amber Archer

Nicole Renee Peters #2

Title:  Love’s Penumbra Embracing Cast Shadows 

Size:  4″h x 5″w x 9″d

Light and Shadow:  “The shape of a cast shadow is related to the shapes of both the casting object and the receiving surface…” The giver and receiver, both reflecting and absorbing light, both playing their dynamic parts in shaping where these shadows lie, what is contained within them. and if and where light will emerge or darkness will take hold.
The human heart, made up of the stuff of this Earth, of fire and heat, water and air, and flecked with both light and shadow, in some places it glistens and shines, reflecting. In other areas it absorbs what is placed around it. Its tendrils softly undulating to hug and hold, or to bind and squeeze, depending…This human heart, informed by the inter-dependence of its cast shadows- the object itself and the surface upon which it sits. Does it ever truly exist alone or independent of its surroundings? Surely our seat of emotions bears influence from the other, and yet, the power to overcome past hurts, limitations, transgressions, pulses and reverberates from our depths- the penumbra of self-awareness, of empowerment- the ability to overcome, to transcend, to reside in pure and unconditional love. This heart of loving-and compassion, our authentic state of being, encased by the penumbra: an extended light source, unconditionally enveloping the outer edge of the cast shadow, is the embodiment of love unconditional, surrounding and holding space for any incursions or deficiencies, without judgement. Here, in the heart of flesh or clay, love prevails through light and through shadow. 

Price:  $300

Statement:  I create from my heart, emotions channeled through my hands, my fingertips, kneading and stroking the clay. I care about creating pieces that are emotionally moving, sensual, and often dynamic. Textural. Most of the forms that emerge are shaped this way by my hands as the primary sculpting tools. I would like for viewers to really get into themselves and FEEL when they come into contact with my work.
Many of my sculptures are conceived and executed through exploration of pushing materials in unconventional ways. I enjoy the process as much as the end result and I really love clay for it’s freeing properties. My work is fluid, organic, loose. Like an impassioned, emotionally charged mad scientist, I allow inspiration to guide me in testing the limits of my creative hypotheses.
Connected to these Earth bodies and the whole of the natural world and cosmos…My work is Elemental, if anything…I am enamored with exploring the multitude of ways that a few common shapes in all of nature repeat over and over again, combined in countless expressions. From the microscopic world to the macroscopic, we are all inter-connected. I am deeply moved by this beauty and intelligence. And very inspired by forms found in nature, particularly in the ocean, fluidity, and by human anatomy and physiology.
Highly expressive, emotional and sensual.  A recurrent theme in my work is:
Finding incredible strength and freedom by allowing oneself to reside in
vulnerability.

Judy Nelson-Moore #2

Title:  Light and Shadow

Size: 14″h x 18″w x 14″d 

Light and Shadow:  This is an edge piece…feeling the edges of both light and shadow…where the edges of myself meet the world.

Price:  $700

Statement:  I am working with the concept and visual aspects of edges:  Edges of mountains where they meet the sky.  Edges of my body as it moves against the air.  Edges of my abilities.  Edges of what I want versus what other people impose on us.  Edges of our memories and hopes.  Edges where light and shadow meet, but the edge itself is nothing, neither light nor shadow. 

More about my work:  www.judynelsonmoore.com

Judy Nelson-Moore

Judy Nelson-Moore #1

Title: Too Much Carbohydrate Will Kill You  

Size:  18″h x 14.5″w x 16″d

Light and Shadow:  In concept, the light is sugar or empty carbohydrates, deserts, fun, party, comfort food. The dark is what happens to a diabetic who has too much light: breakdown of tissues, illness, death. The texture of this piece comes from literally too much carbohydrate (rice and pasta) in the clay, causing it to collapse. 

Price:  $800

Statement:   I am dealing with the concept and visual elements of edges:  Edges of mountains where they meet the sky.  Edges of my body as it moves against the air.  Edges of my abilities.  Edges of what I want versus what other people impose on us.  Edges of memories and hopes.  Edges where light and shadow meet, but the edge itself is nothing, neither light nor shadow.  

This piece contains clay that was fired with an excess of pasta and rice, intended as texture for a closed form, but the carbohydrates burned out and made the clay so weak it collapsed.  Since I am a diabetic, this seemed to be a message about pushing the edges of this disease!  I added skulls made in a sugar-skull mold, unfired clay additions, and a saggar fired “altar” base.  A bowl of clay shards simulates a serving bowl of carbohydrate. 

More about my work:  www.judynelsonmoore.com

Judy Nelson-Moore, Too Much Carbohydrates will Kill You

Tamara Cameron

Title:  Spliced

Size:  9″h x 10″w x 4″d

Light and Shadow:  A representation of the psychological aspect of light and shadow. Taking the dark layers of our psyche, bringing them to the light and pulling together our best self. 

Price:  $400

Statement:  Tamara Cameron’s ceramic sculpture begins with the female torso.  Each piece is hand coiled and built individually.  Three individual torsos are created and cut into sections.  The sections are mixed up and reassembled to create three separate sculptures.  Each finished sculpture contains parts from each of the others representing how over time we exchange pieces of ourselves within relationships and in return become a part of each other.

More about my work:  tamaracameron.com

Tamara Cameron, Spliced

Comments

We welcome your comments and feedback about the New Mexico Potters and Clay Artists Celebration of Clay Exhibit.  Please comment below.

Review of Celebration of Clay, 2003

Celebration of Clay, An Appreciation

by Betsy Williams

The 2003 Celebration of Clay show, a non-juried show open to all members of the New Mexico Potters and Clay Artists, was held at the Harwood Art Center in Albuquerque from September 12 to September 26, with the opening reception held on September 19.

The quality of the work included in this show was, in fact, stunning. Variety, enthusiasm, originality, professionalism, and craftsmanship were apparent in the work submitted by forty member artists with diverse approaches to clay. There were electric, gas, wood, pit, and raku fired pieces; porcelain, stoneware, and earthenware pieces; glazed, stained, and painted pieces; dipped, sprayed, sponged, and dabbed pieces; simple and complex pieces; figurative, abstract, sculptural, functional, and decorative pieces; funny and sad pieces; bright and subtle pieces; by professionals and beginners. Juror Gary Carlson expressed his pleasure at the quality of the work in the exhibit. “It’s great to see so much good work, and so varied, from the New Mexico potters,” he said. “I was proud to be one of the jurors for this show.” As a whole, the level of work was something that all members of the New Mexico Potters Association can be proud of.

Perhaps owing to the very fact that this was a non-juried show, and that members themselves submitted their finest work, the diversity of the work lent a natural fullness and cohesiveness to the show. Work was submitted by artists from all parts of New Mexico, with a concentration of artists from the Albuquerque area, and included artists from Roswell, Dixon, and many points in between. The fluid arrangement of the pieces in relation to one another, thanks to the hard work of volunteers preparing the display, contributed significantly to an impressive exhibit. Skillfully curated, it revealed that there was truly something for everyone. Judy Nelson-Moore, one of the judges, observed, “Many pieces were celebrations of the collaboration between artist and the fire. Others were the development of inner visions of the artist that translated into universal. I think it is a testament to the power of clay as a medium, as well as to the diversity and virtuosity of the NMPA membership, that the show was so diverse and yet, exciting and interesting, when all the pieces were together.”

The judges selecting this year’s award winners were Judy Nelson-Moore, Gary Carlson, and myself. As judges, originality, level of craftsmanship, and a successful execution were three main criteria that we held foremost in our minds, and we gradually narrowed our selections down to a choice for the Best of Show Award, and four choices for Honorable Mention Awards. A total of $400 was awarded in cash prizes. There were many candidates for the awards, and our decisions required individual contemplation as well as group discussion. We learned from one another, sharing our opinions, praises, and critiques of the pieces on display, all the while considering our established objective criteria as well as our own personal standards of excellence.

The Best of Show Winner, Elaine Biery’s “Bosque Tribute II,” won us over with its high level of craftsmanship, successful execution of idea, and interesting glaze and decorative effects. Bosque Tribute, an aptly named bowl, held a row of trees delicately carved on two opposing sides of the bowl’s circumference, and a richly variegated matte blue glaze in the ‘bosque’ interior of the bowl. Elaine is a retired schoolteacher who lives and works in Albuquerque. Congratulations, Elaine, and thank you for entering such a fine piece in the show.

The Honorable Mention Award recipients, listed by in alphabetical order, were:

Pauline Bittner of Albuquerque with “Altarpiece #9,” a deeply mysterious and intriguing piece of assembled slabs with a wide range of abstract surface decoration,

Stephen Cox of Albuquerque with “Probe Fish,” a bulbous fish with a probing snout, made from fabric-like strips of clay delicately wrapped and joined,

Wanda Dent of Roswell, with her remarkable wall piece pair, “Hope and Despair,” rich in symbolism and imagery, skillfully painted and integrated with the figures themselves,

Ashley Wong, a student in the UNM Porcelain Class, with a pleasingly light wheel-thrown “Porcelain Vase” having a tall stem neck and a dark persimmon glaze under a gossamer of freely flowing strands in black.

Congratulations to each of you for your work, uniquely worthy of recognition.

The process of judging as a group meant that while each judge may have chosen different winners if deciding alone, together we chose the awards where there was a meeting of the minds, and where we as a group felt confidence in the integrity of our decisions. There were, without a doubt, many other exceptional pieces, which made us feel the weight of selecting only five awards in all. On behalf of the judges, I would like to thank everyone for entering such fine work in the Celebration of Clay Show. Photographs from the show can be viewed online at www.nmpotters.org.

Next year we hope to make it much more convenient for members statewide to enter their work. We would like to organize drop-off points in key locations outside of Albuquerque, such as Santa Fe, Taos, Roswell, Farmington, and Las Cruces. The designated locations will be able to accept work during a specified number of days prior to show set-up, and volunteers will be asked to transport the work to the show. If you are interested in helping out with this effort, please call me, or any other board member, to discuss your ideas.

Every member, whether beginner, professional, or in between, is encouraged to share his or her vision with the rest of the membership. Let’s all look forward to making next year’s show even more spectacular.

Intimate Visions

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November 1st through 29th, 2013

Exhibit held at
TheGalleryABQLogo

The Gallery ABQ
Hoffmantown Shopping Center
8210 Menaul NE, Albuquerque, NM

Opening Receiption Friday November 1st
5:00 to 8:00 PM

Vote for People’s Choice award online on this website from November 2nd through November 29th, 2013